Wednesday, 7 August 2019

Winter Green


Here in Aotearoa, spring is in a hurry and winter is growling about that. As result of winter's displeasure (pardon blatant 'seasonal anthropomorphism') we've lately been treated to bitter weather blowing in from Antarctica.
However, the signs of spring persist.
It's a time to celebrate what is left of winter and get ready to welcome in the new season.


In our glasshouse, grape leaves are dying in resplendent umber.


Glasshouse guddle waits to be used.


The rhubarb sprouts.


Tulips and daffs share the one pot. Ready to bloom. Soon.


The celery has bravely forged on through the winter. Its bright green, able to be seen from our kitchen window, a tonic for the eyes.


The neighbour's wilderness of a backyard allows wattle to creep through our fence. This will be chopped back. But in the meantime, I'll enjoy its colour and perfume.


 No doubt there are some real variety hibernating hedgehogs sleeping under leaves around here and will emerge once spring truly arrives.


After spring comes summer, and beach days. Shell gathering. Ah, but I mustn't rush things. The days are going fast enough as it is.


2 comments:

Avus said...

As you blossom into spring, we are sliding into autumn. Are your hedgehogs prolific, Kay? over here in UK ours are getting increasingly rare. They are a staple food for badgers which decimate them. Badgers are also causing TB in cattle. Farmers want a general cull of them. The green lobby is fighting it because they look nice, cuddly creatures. (which they ain't - they're predators!)

Kay Cooke said...

Hedgehogs are occasionally seen around here, I wouldn't say we were over-run. In the rural areas there would be more. They aren't an endangered species. They don't get very good press because it's suspected that they carry diseases.
Possums are our predators plus weasels / stoats and of course rats. There are on-gong eradication programmes in place because they're killing off our native birds and flora. I suspect hedgehogs (like many introduced species) are also seen as a bit of a danger to native flora and fauna too. Beatrix Potter-type animals are not looked upon as 'cute and cuddly' over here!

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