Monday, 26 June 2006

It's Elemental My Dear

Cold conditions continue. We woke to another frost this morning with the roads extremely icy. First thing this morning on our way to work, ABM drove the Alfa and I drove CD's (aka Son no. 3) Toyota Corona, in tandem (or is that in a convoy? Dunno if two vehicles qualify as a convoy ... ) to the mechanic's for the Toyota to get what was needed fixed for its warrant of fitness. We were forced to travel at a snail's pace along white roads and up slippery slopes - Friday's daylong comments of Dunedin having 'hills like glass' was echoing in my ears. At one point we had to pull over in order for ABM to scrape ice off the windscreen. However, the sense of achievement once the mission was completed, was worth it. Because yay! Tomorrow I will have my car back and CD's car will be road-worthy again.

During my twelve-minute walk to work from where ABM dropped me off, I couldn't help but realise that first of all there is frost, and then there is frostier frost. I would've welcomed a balaclava. For me, what qualifies as the best of both worlds is to park the car about twenty minutes away from work and walk from there. I plan to keep up this daily exercise and experience of the elements. You really know you're alive when you feel frost on your eyebrows.


We had arranged a place for ABM to pick me up from after work, but I arrived a little early so decided to pop into the Green Acorn cafe and get a coffee-to-go in an attempt to keep warm while standing waiting. (Even though it was only 4.30, it was already beginning to freeze again.) Once inside and about to order, I realised I didn't have my purse with me. Feeling sheepish I explained and was about to scuttle out the door again when the guy said he'd trust me to bring the money in tomorrow, and cheerfully made me a coffee. What a nice guy. He had an accent (I thought it was Scottish or Irish - sometimes I can't tell which is which. I know one lilts up and the other down, but I usually forget which way about it is.)

Turns out he was from Liverpool anyway. He said that Liverpudlians feel more akin to the celts than to the cockneys, so he wasn't offended when I asked if he was from Scotland.
He was telling me that his two flatmates had gone to a party in a field (of course he meant 'paddock', but I forgave him the cultural booboo - especially as I actually prefer the word field to paddock - just as I prefer the word pail to bucket) at Middlemarch over the weekend. It was minus 11 degrees, but they loved it. "But they would, they're hippies," he said, "and I'm not." Apparantly they'd stayed up all night and then watched the sunrise come up out of a valley of mist and frost as the dj hired for the party played on. Awesome, I'd imagine.

But all the same, I think I'm with the Liverpudlian non-hippie; I too prefer to be asleep at that hour, wrapped up warm in my bed, even if an awesome winter sunrise is occurring while I snooze.
I can only take experiencing the elements so far - I do have my limits. Somehow I think this week I've done pretty well. (Refer here to insert for pic of yesterday's polar plunge)
I'm prepared now to quit while I'm ahead.

13 comments:

Cynthia E. Bagley said...

;-) still bragging about that polar plunge, huh?

Yea... I use field and I haven't heard the word paddock since I left the country. Also, pail was the word I used until I met my husband... now it is bucket. Funny how different words mean and feel different.

I agree with you ... snoozing is my sport of choice.

Jules said...

Ok...BRRRRR....You've made me feel the freeze! I'd sleep in wrapped in my cozy bed too!

Catherine said...

It's frosty here too, but I am avoiding hills. Easier to do in Christchurch than in Dunedin.
As for pail/bucket - what about biscuit/cookie? I once worked with a man married to a Canadian. Their daughter had learned to ask her father for a biscuit, but if she asked her mother she asked for a cookie.
Then there is rubber/eraser. That one can really get you into trouble :) (How do I make a winking smiley?)

chiefbiscuit said...

cyn - Too right - nothing like a good skite!

jules - I know, I know - who wants to watch the sun rise over a frrreezing landscape? I'd happily look at photos tho'!

catherine - That's funny! Yes avoid those hills. (To make a winking smiley - press the semi-colon key not the colon.) Now somehow THAT sounds as bad as rubber!

Lynn said...

I always say bucket, but you are right: Pail is nicer.

It's funny to hear you talking about how cold it is when all my clothes are sticking to me and sweat is rolling down my face. 90 degrees here today.

chiefbiscuit said...

lynn - It's unbelievable for me too to think of sweat! Altho at my age you get these hot flushes - called flashes by us Baby Boomers i believe ... which (just to carry on the nice word, bad word theme a little longer) I agree is a nicer word than flushes. So maybe, after all that, i can imagine - for one minute every so often! (Is that all too much information?)

mcdinzie said...

far too much information!!! Well I guess that leaves me to take the piccies of the sun rising over a frosty hill

chiefbiscuit said...

mcd - Now you just settle down!
(That would be your ideal next project then?)

pepektheassassin said...

I'm with Lynn, I just can't even imagine frost and ice, when it's 98 here, and you're only a click of the finger away!

Belle said...

Hi Chief B,

Something mundane, so interesting. This is due to your skill at telling a story! Credit where credit is due.

That coffee guy knows what he is doing!

Thanks for the enjoyable time spent.

mcdinzie said...

I wouldn't say ideal, but yes it is definately on the horizon for us to capture the p;erfect winter sunrise

chiefbiscuit said...

pepek - Believe me it is real!

Belle - thank you Belle! I always enjoy poppin gover for a visit with you too!

mcD - That sounds like a good aim - aim at that horizon!

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